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Water taxi, Brooklyn Bridge, Manhattan, New York

Brooklyn, a borough founded by the Dutch in the 17th century, was independent until 1898 when it became a borough in New York. By 1867, more than a third of Brooklyn's working population took a ferry to work in Manhattan everyday. The East River froze solid in that year and for many weeks business suffered. The New York Bridge Company was formed with the intention to build a bridge across what was one of the busiest stretches of water in the world. At the time the best engineer for the job was considered to be John A Roebling who had already pioneered the invention of wire rope. In The construction of a bridge started in 1869 and took 14 years to complete. He was surveying the foundations for one of the towers in June of that year when a ferry rammed into the pier he was standing on and his right foot was crushed. He died three weeks later and most of the responsibility for building the bridge was now held by his son, Washington. During work in watertight caissons whilst supervising work on the foundations, Washington became ill through what would become known as the bends. He continued on with the work by watching through binoculars from his home and sending instructions to the site through his wife Emily Warren Roebling. The official opening day was May 24th 1883 when various dignitaries made speeches and there was a huge firework display. On the first full day 150,000 pedestrians crossed the bridge. One week after the Brooklyn Bridge was opened, on May 31st, 20,000 people were on the walkway when a woman on a staircase tripped and fell. Her screams set off panic in the crowd and as people dashed to get off the bridge 12 people were trampled to death. The Brooklyn Bridge, stretches 5,989 feet across the East River and is one of the oldest suspension bridges in America. On its completion it was the largest suspension bridges in the world and the first one made of steel wire. The bridge's main span over the river is 1595 feet six inches, cost $15 million to build

USA - Water taxi, Brooklyn Bridge, Manhattan, New York

Spanning the East River from Brooklyn to Manhattan, the Brooklyn Bridge, New York

Brooklyn, a borough founded by the Dutch in the 17th century, was independent until 1898 when it became a borough in New York. By 1867, more than a third of Brooklyn's working population took a ferry to work in Manhattan everyday. The East River froze solid in that year and for many weeks business suffered. The New York Bridge Company was formed with the intention to build a bridge across what was one of the busiest stretches of water in the world. At the time the best engineer for the job was considered to be John A Roebling who had already pioneered the invention of wire rope. In The construction of a bridge started in 1869 and took 14 years to complete. He was surveying the foundations for one of the towers in June of that year when a ferry rammed into the pier he was standing on and his right foot was crushed. He died three weeks later and most of the responsibility for building the bridge was now held by his son, Washington. During work in watertight caissons whilst supervising work on the foundations, Washington became ill through what would become known as the bends. He continued on with the work by watching through binoculars from his home and sending instructions to the site through his wife Emily Warren Roebling. The official opening day was May 24th 1883 when various dignitaries made speeches and there was a huge firework display. On the first full day 150,000 pedestrians crossed the bridge. One week after the Brooklyn Bridge was opened, on May 31st, 20,000 people were on the walkway when a woman on a staircase tripped and fell. Her screams set off panic in the crowd and as people dashed to get off the bridge 12 people were trampled to death. The Brooklyn Bridge, stretches 5,989 feet across the East River and is one of the oldest suspension bridges in America. On its completion it was the largest suspension bridges in the world and the first one made of steel wire. The bridge's main span over the river is 1595 feet six inches, cost $15 million to build

USA - Spanning the East River from Brooklyn to Manhattan, the Brooklyn Bridge, New York

Manhattan New York

New York has architecturally significant buildings in a wide range of styles. These include the Woolworth Building (1913), an early gothic revival skyscraper built with massively scaled gothic detailing able to be read from street level several hundred feet below. The 1916 Zoning Resolution required setback in new buildings, and restricted towers to a percentage of the lot size, to allow sunlight to reach the streets below. The Art Deco design of the Chrysler Building (1930), with its tapered top and steel spire, reflected the zoning requirements. The building is considered by many historians and architects to be New York's finest building, with its distinctive ornamentation such as replicas at the corners of the 61st floor of the 1928 Chrysler eagle hood ornaments and V-shaped lighting inserts capped by a steel spire at the tower's crown. A highly influential example of the international style in the United States is the Seagram Building (1957), distinctive for its facade using visible bronze-toned I-beams to evoke the building's structure. The Condé Nast Building (2000) is an important example of green design in American skyscrapers.

USA - Manhattan New York

Spanning the East River from Brooklyn to Manhattan, the Brooklyn Bridge, New York

Brooklyn, a borough founded by the Dutch in the 17th century, was independent until 1898 when it became a borough in New York. By 1867, more than a third of Brooklyn's working population took a ferry to work in Manhattan everyday. The East River froze solid in that year and for many weeks business suffered. The New York Bridge Company was formed with the intention to build a bridge across what was one of the busiest stretches of water in the world. At the time the best engineer for the job was considered to be John A Roebling who had already pioneered the invention of wire rope. In The construction of a bridge started in 1869 and took 14 years to complete. He was surveying the foundations for one of the towers in June of that year when a ferry rammed into the pier he was standing on and his right foot was crushed. He died three weeks later and most of the responsibility for building the bridge was now held by his son, Washington. During work in watertight caissons whilst supervising work on the foundations, Washington became ill through what would become known as the bends. He continued on with the work by watching through binoculars from his home and sending instructions to the site through his wife Emily Warren Roebling. The official opening day was May 24th 1883 when various dignitaries made speeches and there was a huge firework display. On the first full day 150,000 pedestrians crossed the bridge. One week after the Brooklyn Bridge was opened, on May 31st, 20,000 people were on the walkway when a woman on a staircase tripped and fell. Her screams set off panic in the crowd and as people dashed to get off the bridge 12 people were trampled to death. The Brooklyn Bridge, stretches 5,989 feet across the East River and is one of the oldest suspension bridges in America. On its completion it was the largest suspension bridges in the world and the first one made of steel wire. The bridge's main span over the river is 1595 feet six inches, cost $15 million to build

USA - Spanning the East River from Brooklyn to Manhattan, the Brooklyn Bridge, New York

The Woolworth Building, Manhattan, New York

The Woolworth Building was designed by the architect Cass Gilbert and commissioned by Frank Winfield Woolworth. It was constucted 1911-1913, is 792 feet high and for 16 years was the tallest skyscraper in the world until succeeded by the Chrysler Building.From a 29 storey platform the building becomes a tower, on the very top of which is a 3 storey, 125 foot tall copper clad roof. The Gothic Style building has gargoyles, turrets, pinnacles and buttresses. The lobby has glass mosaics, polished steel doors and walls lined with dark marble from Skyros. It also includes caricatures of Frank Woolworth counting out coins, Cass Gilbert cradling a scale model of his building and Gunwald Aus who was the structural engineer, measuring a steel girder. Frank Woolworth paid for the building which cost $13.5 million, in cash. He said " I do not want a mere building. I want something that will be an ornament to the city" The tower gained the nickname "The Cathedral of Commerce".

USA - The Woolworth Building, Manhattan, New York

The Municipal Building, Manhattan, New York

The Municipal Building was constructed by McKim, Mead and White in 1914 and designed by William Mitchell Kendall. The building is 559 feet tall and on the very top of the building there is a 20 foot gilded statue of "Civic Fame".

USA - The Municipal Building, Manhattan, New York

St Paul's Chapel, Church Street, Manhattan, New York

St. Paul's Chapel is located on Church Street and is an Episcopal Chapel. It was completed in 1766 at which time it stood in open fields. The church is built of Manhattan Schist. George Washington worshipped here on 30th April 1879 when he was inaugurated as President of the United States of America. After the attacks on the World Trade Center on September 11th the church was used as a refuge for rescue workers- it didn't even have a window broken.

USA - St Paul's Chapel, Church Street, Manhattan, New York

North Cove, Yacht Harbour, World Financial Center, New York

New York has architecturally significant buildings in a wide range of styles. These include the Woolworth Building (1913), an early gothic revival skyscraper built with massively scaled gothic detailing able to be read from street level several hundred feet below. The 1916 Zoning Resolution required setback in new buildings, and restricted towers to a percentage of the lot size, to allow sunlight to reach the streets below. The Art Deco design of the Chrysler Building (1930), with its tapered top and steel spire, reflected the zoning requirements. The building is considered by many historians and architects to be New York's finest building, with its distinctive ornamentation such as replicas at the corners of the 61st floor of the 1928 Chrysler eagle hood ornaments and V-shaped lighting inserts capped by a steel spire at the tower's crown. A highly influential example of the international style in the United States is the Seagram Building (1957), distinctive for its facade using visible bronze-toned I-beams to evoke the building's structure. The Condé Nast Building (2000) is an important example of green design in American skyscrapers.

USA - North Cove, Yacht Harbour, World Financial Center, New York

Goldman, Sachs Tower near the Colgate Clock, New Jersey

The Goldman, Sachs Tower is situated in Jersey City and is the tallest building in New Jersey. It was designed by Cesar Pelli, built in 2004, has 42 floors and stands 781 feet tall.

USA - Goldman, Sachs Tower near the Colgate Clock, New Jersey

"Floating Island" being tugged around Manhattan Island.

This "Floating Island" by Robert Smithson is inside a barge and weighs 150 tons. The 30 by 90 foot plot of floating land has schist rocks inside it which can be seen in Central Park and forms the bedrock there. Robert Smithson had the original concept of the island back in 1970 but only made one detailed sketch of his idea. Due to the artist's death in 1975 it was left to a team led by Diane Shamash to translate the sketch into a reality. The only notes they had to work from merely specified that the plants had to be native to New York and included a willow tree. I really liked it.

USA -

The Mall, Central Park, New York

The Mall is one of the formal features in the design by Olmstead and Vaux.It was intended as an area where people dressed in their best Sunday clothes could stroll up and down and socialise hence it is 40 foot wide.In order to provide shade for all these people four rows of American elms were planted on either side of the walkway. It has been described as "walking in a cathedral of trees" and that is certainly true. Plus the framework of the trees, the branches and the trunks, looks so artistic.

USA - The Mall, Central Park, New York

Bronze statue of Hans Christian Anderson, in Central Park, New York

A bronze statue of Hans Christian Anderson in Central Park, near Conservatory Water. He has an open book on his lap which is the story of "The Ugly Duckling" and at his feet there is a bronze duck. The statue was created by Georg Lober who was born in Chicago and was installed in the park in 1956. On summer weekends, storytellers stand there and tell folktales, including those by Hans Christian Anderson.

USA - Bronze statue of Hans Christian Anderson, in Central Park, New York

Bronze statue of Hans Christian Anderson, in Central Park, New York

A bronze statue of Hans Christian Anderson in Central Park, near Conservatory Water. He has an open book on his lap which is the story of "The Ugly Duckling" and at his feet there is a bronze duck. The statue was created by Georg Lober who was born in Chicago and was installed in the park in 1956. On summer weekends, storytellers stand there and tell folktales, including those by Hans Christian Anderson.

USA - Bronze statue of Hans Christian Anderson, in Central Park, New York

Alice in Wonderland bronze sculpture by Jose de Creeft in Central Park New York

The "Alice in Wonderland" statue is a bronze sculpted by Jose de Creeft and was unveiled in 1959. Alice is sitting on a large mushroom surrounded by Lewis Carroll characters- the Mad Hatter, the White Rabbit, the Cheshire Cat, the Caterpillar, the March Hare, the Dormouse and Alice's kitten, Dinah. The Mad Hatter is said to be a caricature of George Delacorte who donated the work in memory of his wife Margarita.De Creeft included lines from Jabberwocky, Margarita's favourite poem in a granite circle around the statue. The book's drawings were originally by John Tenniel and de Creeft partly used them to model the face of Alice. This eleven foot and much clambered upon statue is situated near Conservatory Water and is beautiful. There is another statue in Central Park of Alice in Wonderland by George Frederick Richard Roth in the James Michael Levin Playground.

USA - Alice in Wonderland bronze sculpture by Jose de Creeft in Central Park New York

Chrysler Building Manhattan New York

Walter P Chrysler, the car manufacturer, founded his corporation in 1925 and wanted headquarters in New York to symbolize the company. William Van Alen was the architect and his original plan was to produce a chrome structure to be the tallest in the world at 840 feet high .However, a battle started when H. Craig Severance, his previous partner and now rival, announced that his design for the new headquarters of the Bank of Manhattan would be two feet higher than the Chrysler building. In 1929 the bank topped out at 927 feet after having had ten penthouse floors added and a fifty foot flagpole. However, six weeks after it looked like Severance had won, a 185 foot steel spire which had been assembled inside the lift shaft was raised up and bolted in place. The spike raised the Chrysler building's height to 1046 feet which was 117 feet higher than the Bank of Manhattan. On the 61st floor there are stainless steel gargoyles of eagles, those on lower floors were shaped to resemble the radiator caps of a 1928 Chrysler car. The spire was modeled on a radiator grille and was restored in 1996. The only full time occupant of the building was Margaret Bourke White. She was a photojournalist and lived and worked in a highly decorated studio on the 61st floor. The lobby was used as a showroom for Chrysler cars and is decorated with patterned marble and granite from around the world. A vast painted ceiling shows transportation scenes of the late 1920's. One year after its completion it lost the title of the highest building to the Empire State Building.

USA - Chrysler Building Manhattan New York

Chrysler Building Manhattan New York

Walter P Chrysler, the car manufacturer, founded his corporation in 1925 and wanted headquarters in New York to symbolize the company. William Van Alen was the architect and his original plan was to produce a chrome structure to be the tallest in the world at 840 feet high .However, a battle started when H. Craig Severance, his previous partner and now rival, announced that his design for the new headquarters of the Bank of Manhattan would be two feet higher than the Chrysler building. In 1929 the bank topped out at 927 feet after having had ten penthouse floors added and a fifty foot flagpole. However, six weeks after it looked like Severance had won, a 185 foot steel spire which had been assembled inside the lift shaft was raised up and bolted in place. The spike raised the Chrysler building's height to 1046 feet which was 117 feet higher than the Bank of Manhattan. On the 61st floor there are stainless steel gargoyles of eagles, those on lower floors were shaped to resemble the radiator caps of a 1928 Chrysler car. The spire was modeled on a radiator grille and was restored in 1996. The only full time occupant of the building was Margaret Bourke White. She was a photojournalist and lived and worked in a highly decorated studio on the 61st floor. The lobby was used as a showroom for Chrysler cars and is decorated with patterned marble and granite from around the world. A vast painted ceiling shows transportation scenes of the late 1920's. One year after its completion it lost the title of the highest building to the Empire State Building.

USA - Chrysler Building Manhattan New York

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